Thursday, December 4, 2014

The Cemetery In Terlingua, Texas

On our way to Big Bend National Park we took a short tour through Terlingua, Texas.  We were not really looking for anything particular, just looking.  We came across the Terlingua Cemetery and had to stop!


It doesn't seem like much, but to see all these old simple wooden crosses protruding in a multitude of directions from the hard rocky floor of the west Texas desert was an amazing sight to behold.



As in all cemeteries there were old abandoned graves, and more modern very immaculate graves.

I don't recall seeing any names on these below, but there was great care in their maintenance.





There were several raised (for lack of a better term, at least in my limited vocabulary) graves.

Again, some looked newer.


But  more of them were much much older.


Many of the graves only had rocks covering the area or just the perimeter of the grave.  I mean there really is only so much that will grow out there.  A person can't expect a lovely carpet of green grass to grow over the grave, so this would be the sensible alternative.





Some the graves marked the passing of adults.


Some marked the passing of children.



It had all the requirements to make it a cemetery....graves.  Lots and lots of graves.  But, I am glad that we got the visit this particular cemetery.  It brings to mind that the people of Terlingua really are a different type of people.  They live in a remote part of Texas in a tiny town where the sun beats down relentlessly most of the year.  It takes a tough person to put up with that type of atmosphere.  I can't imagine what it was like back when Terlingua was a mining town!

I leave you with one last shot from the cemetery.  It is my personal favorite. 


In my next post I will delight you with a tale of our hike on a trail in Big Bend National Park.

Until then!

2 comments:

  1. I haven't been to the Terlingua cemetery. But we stopped by the Shafter cemetery last time we were out that way. It's outside Marfa, a former silver mining town, labeled a ghost town but very few still live there. Anyway, it was much like the Terlingua cemetery except there was a newer part across from the original. Most of the graves in the original part were just wooden crosses, perhaps unknown mine workers, I don't know. On another note, we did some cemetery projects with the kids out there several years back. I don't remember all details because I was indirectly involved. But it seems like it was Marfa where the kids actually mapped the cemetery. One side was fairly well marked out but the other side was older and had a lot of their ancestor's graves. They cleaned and mapped out the graves. It was a really interesting project and they were proud to find their relatives. We did it in other small towns out there as well.

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    1. How cool that they kids got to map the cemetery!

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